[LINK] CANOPY, biannual news from WWF Forest and Climate

[LINK] CANOPY, biannual news from WWF Forest and Climate

© André Bärtschi / WWF

CANOPY is a biannual newsletter from WWF Forest and Climate that provides the latest news and information on WWF’s REDD+- related activities.

In this edition, we focus on supporting Indigenous participation, forest and climate work in Nepal, and carbon mapping in DRC. In addition, we highlight ways our team members are contributing to the field. As always, we feature the latest REDD+ news from around the world, learning resources, and upcoming events.

SIgn up here.

IN NO UNCERTAIN TERMS: RSPO CERTIFICATION

IN NO UNCERTAIN TERMS: RSPO CERTIFICATION

This comprehensive set of manuals – for producers, processors and auditors – covering all relevant RSPO requirements in detail, now available in hard copies (USD 350/set) and soft copies (USD 250/set). Hard copies can be personalised to your own company, including your company logo and editorial pages. This will be of particular interest for Volume 2.1 for circulation to smallholders and independent growers as part of a group scheme!

  • RSPO P&C Certification for Oil Palm Growers and Oil Mills (Volume 1)
  • RSPO P&C Certification for Group Managers, Independent Growers and Smallholders (Volume 2)
  • RSPO P&C Certification for Smallholders as part of a group scheme (Volume 2.1)
  • RSPO Supply Chain Certification for the Palm Oil and Palm Kernel Supply Chains (Volume 3)
  • RSPO P&C and Supply Chain Certification for the Certification Bodies and Auditors (Volume 4)

Contact bart[at]auditor[dot]id for inquiries and special offers.

[VIDEO] Indonesia’s rapid deforestation

[VIDEO] Indonesia’s rapid deforestation

Indonesia has one of the world’s largest remaining areas of tropical forests. From tigers and orangutans to Sumatran elephants, the forests support a stunning array of wildlife. They also soak up huge amounts of climate-warming carbon dioxide.

But an area of Indonesian forest the size of Delaware is cleared each year by loggers and palm oil companies. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the consequences of Indonesia’s rapid deforestation for wildlife, the climate and people.

Read more here.

Bogor HHH Run #1993 Reach for the Sky

Bogor HHH Run #1993 Reach for the Sky

Set an awesome 9K run today at Rancabungur, Bogor. Considered “flat” for Bogor hounds, the run still had some decent ups and downs, see image below.

[LINK] RSPO Compliance assessments in 2015 and 2016, Summary and conclusions

[LINK] RSPO Compliance assessments in 2015 and 2016, Summary and conclusions

Figure 2 Normative references and the number of findings raised by ASI during the compliance assessments (Note: the number of findings is indicated after the “;”).

Of course, this conclusion depends heavily on the – possibly flawed – assumption that ASI’s own competence and expertise is picture perfect:

nearly all [certification bodies] lack adequate competence and experience to respond to [Accreditation Services International] findings. This probably also translates to the [certification bodies] not being able to effectively evaluate the responses of their [certificate holders], this is confirmed by some of the [Accreditation Services International] findings.

Download report here.

[LINK] RSPO accused of letting palm oil firm proceed with dodgy audits in Papua

[LINK] RSPO accused of letting palm oil firm proceed with dodgy audits in Papua

An oil palm plantation in Sumatra. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay

The RSPO confirmed to Mongabay that its Secretariat commissioned an independent review of Nabire Baru’s NPP submission before it was published. The review found that its High Conservation Value assessment, required under RSPO rules, was “unsatisfactory” and should be re-done. The assessment was carried out by a team of Bogor Agricultural University lecturers led by Nyoto Santoso, whose RSPO audits have been repeatedly exposed as filled with misleading claims.

Read more here.

MB | Connectivity and coexistence key to orangutan survival on croplands

MB | Connectivity and coexistence key to orangutan survival on croplands

  • Orangutans are in drastic decline, largely due to habitat loss. From 1973–2010, Borneo lost 39 percent of its forests; estimates say that another 37 percent of orangutan-suitable habitat will be converted to agricultural use there through 2025. Similarly, 60 percent of habitat suitable for Sumatran orangutans was lost between 1985 and 2007.
  • If orangutans are to survive in the wild through the 21st century, researchers will need to discover ways in which the animals can be helped to coexist with humans within agricultural landscapes. Researchers are also looking for creative ways to provide connectivity between remaining forest patches to promote and preserve genetic resilience.
  • Scientists Gail Campbell-Smith, Marc Ancrenaz and others have shown that orangutans can use croplands, including oil palm plantations, if humans work to prevent conflict. Noise deterrents, such as bamboo cannon guns, along with the education of farm laborers and agribusiness companies, are techniques helping to reduce animal-human conflicts.
  • Researcher Marc Ancrenaz and colleagues provided orangutans and other arboreal wildlife with rope bridges over small rivers in Malaysia — a successful approach to providing connectivity. It took four years for orangutans to begin using the bridges, but now young orangutan males use the structures to disperse more widely.

Read more here.

[LINK] The lazy person’s guide to saving the world

[LINK] The lazy person’s guide to saving the world

End extreme poverty. Fight inequality and injustice. Fix climate change. Whoa. The Global Goals are important, world-changing objectives that will require cooperation among governments, international organizations and world leaders. It seems impossible that the average person can make an impact. Should you just give up?

No! Change starts with you. Seriously. Every human on earth—even the most indifferent, laziest person among us—is part of the solution. Fortunately, there are some super easy things we can adopt into our routines that, if we all do it, will make a big difference.

Read more here.

[LINK] A Hidden Room at the Guggenheim Will Transport You into a Soundless, Sublime World

[LINK] A Hidden Room at the Guggenheim Will Transport You into a Soundless, Sublime World

Doug Wheeler: PSAD Synthetic Desert III; on view 03/24/2017-08/02/2017; The architectural modification of an existing room allows the artist to achieve subtle manipulations of light, space, and sound. The Guggenheim installation, produced in close collaboration with the artist, will be the first time Synthetic Desert—or any work in this series—has ever been completed and shown.

Wish there was such a room in/near Jakarta…

Tucked away on the Guggenheim’s seventh floor, in a tiny room accessible only to visitors who pass through a red stanchion and three heavy doors bearing industrial locks, lies one of the museum’s most mind-bending shows in recent memory.

It’s not imposing or loud like some of the big, buzzy exhibitions that have occupied the museum’s spectacular Frank Lloyd Wright-designed rotunda in the past. Doug Wheeler’s “PSAD Synthetic Desert III,” up through August 2nd, is a different kind of sensory experience: one decidedly quieter and altogether more transportive.

Read more here.